Marianne Moore: Poetry

April 2, 2010

Transportation in the Cumberland Valley

Filed under: Biographical Essays — by moore123 @ 6:13 pm
Tags: , , , ,

Cumberland Valley Rail Line

When Moore was growing up in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, before automobiles were common, the rail line above was Moore’s gateway to Harrisburg, less than 20 miles away, and from there to Philadelphia and Bryn Mawr on the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was also the route to family in Hagerstown, Greencastle, and even to the dentist in Baltimore.

Carlisle Train Station, early 1930s

The station building was built in the 19th Century and was the one used by the Moores when they left home. It was on West Pitt Street, a few blocks from where the Moore family lived at 343 N. Hanover Street.

This postcard is from a series of images of Carlisle which will appear here from time to time.

4 Comments »

  1. MM’s mention of the “Cumberland Timetable” probably referred to the slow progress of the train through the main streets of towns in the Cumberland Valley. A TGV it was not!

    Comment by moore123 — April 8, 2010 @ 12:23 pm |Reply

  2. Here’s one of the pics. Click on it twice and it will get bigger and you’ll see lots of detail. The guy I happened to catch in the photo got rather irate that I had snapped his picture, but I hadn’t even paid attention to the fact that he was in it. He should watch where he’s walking!

    Comment by Kirby Olson — April 3, 2010 @ 2:58 pm |Reply

    • Kirby,

      I’ve buried this fine photo. Might I use it on my Moore blog with attribution to you?

      Pat

      Comment by Pat Cannon — May 15, 2010 @ 11:22 am |Reply

  3. I really enjoyed seeing these. I didn’t understand what she meant when she said something about the Carlisle timetable the other day (I think you quoted it) and still don’t.

    The train station is quite handsome. I stopped in front of her house in October of last year and snapped a pic from the Sunoco across the street. The front is some kind of artificial brick, I thought. That is, it is meant to look like a cement brick, but it was some artificial substance.

    Comment by Kirby Olson — April 3, 2010 @ 10:28 am |Reply


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